Behind The Scenes At Diamond Glassing

I love everything about surfboard glassing shops. The smell of the resin, the characters that work at them, the boards that come out of them, and the funny little hand-drawn signs scribbled haphazardly onto the walls.

I love everything about surfboard glassing shops; the smell of the resin, the characters that work there, the boards that come out of them, and the funny little hand-drawn signs scribbled haphazardly onto the walls.

Behind The Scenes At Diamond Glassing

Ahhh, the smell of resin. It brings back childhood memories of sweeping out the old Agua Surfboards shop when I was 12 years old and couldn’t afford a board. The old curmudgeon who ran the place, Rod, would make us get the crew beer (all you needed to buy booze back then was a note from an adult) and sweep the foam dust from the floors in exchange for little 5’4”s with day glow airbrushes.

Except for the price of resin and the closure of Clark Foam, things haven’t changed much since then; guys who work in glassing shops still use words that would make a sailor blush and are still under-appreciated by the masses. Why is this? It’s not like a surfboard goes from the shaping machine straight to your favorite shop—talented craftsman bust their asses to make sure the shaped foam is perfectly encased in resin and fiberglass.

Next time you see a dude with foam dust in his hair and shoes covered in resin, buy that man a beer and give him a pat on the back for we would be nowhere without skilled glassers and sanders. Here are a few photos I took with my camera phone (hence the poor quality of the photos) this morning while picking up a new board from JS Industries SoCal wing. Thanks a million to the bros at JS and Diamond Glassing, now it’s time to get that bad boy wet…

These are the racks that are used to hold up boards as they get glassed. These were full of freshly glassed boards when I arrived. Every year some kid has the glorious job of hammering out the built-up resin.

These are the racks that are used to hold up boards as they get glassed. Every year some kid has the glorious job of hammering out the built-up resin.

What was interesting to me was the fact that boards with Futures Fins setup were glassed first, then the fin boxes were cut into the boards using a router. The boards with FCS fin setups were in an entirely different room.

What was interesting to me was the fact that boards with Futures Fins setup were glassed first, then the fin boxes were cut into the boards using a router. The boards with FCS fin setups were in an entirely different room.

This whole wall was full of boards that were to have FCS plugs installed into them. Contrary to the boards with Futures, these will have the plugs installed before they are glassed.

This whole wall was full of boards that were to have FCS plugs installed into them. Contrary to the boards with Futures, these will have the plugs installed before they are glassed.

A few years ago, this 55-gallon drum of resin used to cost around $400. Today, the same drum goes for $1200. Think about that before you complain about the price of a surfboard.

A few years ago, this 55-gallon drum of resin used to cost around $400. Today, the same drum goes for $1200. Think about that before you complain about the price of a surfboard.

The cryptonite to resin, acetone, is used to clean all the tools that go into the glassing process.

The cryptonite to resin, acetone, is used to clean all the tools that go into the glassing process.

This room is where all the airbrush magic goes down. A lot of the JS boards have art on top of the glass (as opposed to on the shaped piece of foam) and are hand-drawn with a Posca paint pen. A clear sealant is applied at the end of the process to seal the deal.

This room is where all the airbrush magic goes down. A lot of the JS Industries boards have art on top of the glass (as opposed to on the shaped piece of foam) and are hand-drawn with a Posca paint pen. A clear sealant is applied at the end of the process to seal the deal.

Click Through To The Next Page…

Pages: 1 2