Hurricane Season Forecast: 15 T.S., 8 Hurricanes

With spring here and neoprene beginning to be shed, the scent of the Atlantic Ocean Hurricane Season is in the air. Colorado State University just released their annual April updated forecast for the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season and it tells us there will be storms. These forecasts can be interesting (all 40 or so pages), but ultimately you have to take this with a grain of salt. It’s a good jumping off point and gets into some interesting info about how this winter being a solid El Nino year will affect hurricane season. Dig around in there if you’ve got some time and know that there will be hurricane surf, as there is practically every year. Below is the list of the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season storm names (always fun to check out).

2010 Hurricane Names

Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter

Check out our award-winning 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season coverage and get psyched for the formation of the first storm!

Hurricane Bill was easily the best producer of swell for the East Coast in 2009. Unfortunately this Coast Guard Capt. lost his job when they saw this photo we ran. Sorry about that one! Photo: T. Colla

Hurricane Bill was easily the best producer of swell for the East Coast in 2009. Unfortunately this Coast Guard Capt. lost his job when they saw this photo we ran. Sorry about that one! Photo: T. Colla


Article On CSU’s 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Surf Forecast

April 8, 2010 : – - The Atlantic will experience up to more than twice as many hurricanes as it did in 2009, according to the latest seasonal prediction by the Tropical Meteorology Project at Colorado State University. The forecast calls for 15 named storms and eight hurricanes. Four of the hurricanes are expected to be major.

In 2009 there were nine named storms and three hurricanes in the Atlantic. Hurricane season begins June 1 and lasts through Nov. 30. Tropical Meterology Project’s Phil Klotzbach said he is confident in the forecast this year, ”we’re pretty sure El Niño is not going to be in place,”

The Atlantic is near record warmth, particularly in the tropical and subtropical regions where hurricanes form. And there is good agreement among computer models — 15 out of 20 — that El Niño is on the way out.

Klotzbach points to the warmer than normal sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic and colder than normal sea surface temperatures in the South Atlantic. When that variation happens, the doldrums — the region where winds north and south of the equator converge — move further north. That shift causes changes in the trade winds that give the atmosphere more spin, which helps hurricanes form.

Check out the CSU’s 2010 Hurricane Seasin Forecast

Hurricane/Cyclone links:

2010 Hurricane Season Links
Tropical Analysis and Forecasting (NOAA)
East Coast Wave Charts/Cams etc (Surforecasts)

NHC Forecasts & Warnings(NOAA)
NHC Latest Satellite Imagary (NOAA)

Central Pacific Hurricane Center (NOAA)
West Pacific Typhoon Tracking (HZN)

Tropical Analysis and Forecasting (NOAA)