Coconut Wireless: Rainy Days And The Evil Media

Looking into the heart of Waimea Valley where all the rain and shit water comes from. Photo: Flynn

Looking into the heart of Waimea Valley where all the rain and shit water comes from. Photo: Flynn

I always thought it was funny how the surf media rated the North Shore winter season by the six-week period of time they infest the 7-mile miracle each year. The true North Shore winter season actually starts in September and stretches all the way to April or May…that’s 8 or 9 months of consistent surf! Judging how our first part of the media-hyped “season” is going, it would be safe to say that this winter is the worst in years. Post that all over the Internet and print it on the covers of every international magazine! At least for now, the waves and weather have been marginal at best. Lately, the ocean has been brown due to heavy downpours and blown-out river mouths…wow, that could be a beautiful analogy for how the North Shore Boys have been taking to, and treating, the heavy influx of eager girls here now, especially since the Boys frequent the bars and clubs more than the crappy surf lately. Gotta love it, everyone does!

Right now the waves are flat and the ocean is brown. The Reef Hawaiian Pro has run one day, and it’s hard to tell if they’re going to pull off three more full days of competition before the end of the waiting period on the 23rd. I wouldn’t be surprised if they run heats out at Avalanche across the channel from Haleiwa because it picks up more swell—but we’ll just have to wait and see.

Despite the warnings at the Waimea river mouth, some people feel they're immune to leptospirosis. Photo: Flynn

Despite the warnings at the Waimea river mouth, some people feel they're immune to leptospirosis. Photo: Flynn

The marginal surf has consisted of a couple of North East swells that swept long rights down the coast, along with a shit load of sand back where it started this summer in front of the Pipeline area—which is no good for Pipeline.

I honestly don’t mind this cycle of heavy weather and weak waves, mainly due to the fact that it’ll blow over and clean up before we know it. That’s the beauty of living on a rock in the middle of the Pacific Ocean; rapid changes and various combinations with weather, waves, and even people!—Aloha, Flynn.